Story display


ID:

738

Date:

2015-01-26

Headline:

U.S. Spies on Millions of Drivers

Reporter's name:

Devlin Barrett

Delay/denial:

No

Lawsuit:

No

Fees:

No

Media outlet:

Wall Street Journal

City:

Washington, DC

Summary:

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has scanned and stored information about Americans’ cars for years as an anti-drug effort at American borders, but the federal database has grown to reach “throughout the United States” for suspects in other crimes – and now includes hundreds of millions of records about American motorists suspected of, in most cases, nothing.

Notes:

The American Civil Liberties Union used FOIA to obtain documents from the DEA. The ACLU also noted that the Department of Homeland Security had cancelled a “national license-plate tracking plan” (see "Department of Homeland Security cancels national license-plate tracking plan," February 19, 2014, http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/dhs-cancels-national-license-plate-tracking-plan/2014/02/19/a4c3ef2e-99b4-11e3-b931-0204122c514b_story.html). However, the ACLU also noted that the DHS announcement only referred to a proposal from the DHS’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement and did not acknowledge the DEA program. (For more background, see "Setting the record straight on DHS and license plate tracking," February 21, 2014, https://www.aclu.org/blog/technology-and-liberty-national-security-immigrants-rights/setting-record-straight-dhs-and)

Keywords:

Drug Enforcement Agency, DEA, Department of Justice, DOJ, license plates, license-plate reader, border, database, motorists, asset seizure, civil forfeiture, crime, drugs, surveillance, electronic surveillance, American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU, Patrick Leahy, Amber Alert, guns, currency, contraband, El Paso Intelligence Center, U.S. Marshals Service, USMS

URL:

http://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-spies-on-millions-of-cars-1422314779


Agencies:

DEA
DOJ
USMS

States:

AZ
CA
DC
FL
GA
NJ
NM
NV
TX
UT

Categories:

civil rights
intelligence
justice
law enforcement
technology
transportation


Return to front page