Story display


ID:

721

Date:

2013-12-30

Headline:

The Fix Isn’t In: Why a Safety Device That Can Stop Overdoses by Kids Isn’t Widely Used

Reporter's name:

T. Christian Miller and Jeff Gerth

Delay/denial:

No

Lawsuit:

No

Fees:

No

Media outlet:

ProPublica

City:

Washington, DC

Summary:

A doctor at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) helped persuade drugmakers to spend pennies per bottle of children’s acetaminophen to add a “flow restrictor” to reduce accidental overdoses, but drugmakers and regulators have been slow to consider adding such restrictors to other bottles of children’s medicine.

Notes:

FOIA led to the release of a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) report from 2001, which showed agency experts recommended manufacturers use flow restrictors – or barriers of some sort – to prevent acetaminophen overdoses, yet ten years later, the FDA’s advisory committee was divided about whether it should, or even could, require restrictors.

Keywords:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Medication Safety Program, Centers for Disease Control, CDC, emergency room, children, medication, overdose, pain reliever, cough syrup, flow restrictor, medicine bottle, acetaminophen, Tylenol, Consumer Reports, McNeil Consumer Healthcare, Johnson & Johnson, Consumer Product Safety Commission, CPSC

URL:

http://www.propublica.org/article/why-a-safety-device-that-could-prevent-thousands-of-drug-accidents-by-kids


Agencies:

CDC
CPSC
FDA

States:

CA
DC
NY

Categories:

business
drug safety


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